5 People Who Changed The History Of LGBT

It’s a big time to be gay In many ways. Same-sex couples holding hands in public is increasingly becoming normal. We now celebrate the wedding between two same-sex people.

It’s a big time to be gay In many ways. Same-sex couples holding hands in public is increasingly becoming normal. We now celebrate the wedding between two same-sex people.

And yet, in the three months following the Brexit vote, homophobic attacks increased by 147% across the Atlantic. America’s Vice President, Mike Pence opposed gay marriage. He signed a bill empowering the businesses to refuse gay and transgender customers on the grounds of religious freedom. There is also an increased risk of mental health problems for LGBT people.

So there’s a lot left to struggle for. Let’s remember some of the remarkable people who have struggled for gay rights.

Karl Heinrich Ulrichs

The first gay person to speak out for homosexual rights in public. Karl Heinrich Ulrichs worked a civil servant in Germany until he was forced to resign in 1854 on because of his homosexuality.

He became an activist and wrote 12 volumes of work about sexuality. His publishes includes what are considered to be the first theory about homosexuality. He explained that it is an ‘inborn condition’ not a profound corruption, as was the general wisdom at the time.

In 1867, he urged the German government to abolish anti-homosexuality laws, which strongly proved himself as the pioneer of the gay rights movement.

Barbara Gittings

The mother of the LGBT civil rights movement, Barbara Gittings was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1932. She moved to Philadelphia, the USA at the age of 18.

In the 1970s, she was a leading member of the American Psychiatric Association’s movement to get homosexuality eliminated from the list of psychiatric disorders.

In 2006, The APA acknowledged her work by awarding her its first annual civil rights award.

Harvey Milk

The first openly gay person elected to public office,  Harvey Milk was born in New York in 1930 and became a leading gay rights activist.  After moving to San Francisco in 1972,

he found his voice in gay rights activist. He became the first gay person openly elected to public office. He won a seat on the San Francisco City Council Board after two previous unsuccessful attempts. Milk was shot dead in 1978 by Dan White, a fellow City Council board member.

Harvey Milk’s life has been marked in plenty of books and films, including the award-winning Milk (2008) starring Sean Penn.

Magnus Hirschfeld

The father of transgenderism, Hirschfeld is considered to have invented the term ‘transvestitism’. He set the world’s first gender identity clinic, whose clients included Einar Wegener (the protagonist of 2015’s The Danish Girl. She transitioned to become Lili Elbe, one of the first persons to undergo gender reassignment surgery. After moving to Berlin in 1896, Hirschfeld started researching sexuality where he lived openly as a gay man and fought for gay rights. He was once described by Hitler as “the most dangerous Jew in Germany”, and the whole library of his Institute for Sexual Science was destroyed by the Nazis.

Audre Lorde

The lesbian warrior poet, Audre Lorde represented herself as a ‘black lesbian mother warrior poet’.

Born in New York in 1934, Lorde served as a librarian for many years before she published her first volume of poetry, First Cities, in 1968. Her work covered everything from civil rights (The Black Unicorn) and sexuality to her own battle with breast cancer (A Burst of Light, for which Lorde received an American Book Award). She inspired Barbara Smith to establish Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, the first U.S. publisher run by, for, and about women of color. In 2001, the Audre Lorde Award was started to honor works of lesbian poetry.

And yet, in the three months following the Brexit vote, homophobic attacks increased by 147% across the Atlantic. America’s Vice President, Mike Pence opposed gay marriage. He signed a bill empowering the businesses to refuse gay and transgender customers on the grounds of religious freedom. There is also an increased risk of mental health problems for LGBT people.

So there’s a lot left to struggle for. Let’s remember some of the remarkable people who have struggled for gay rights.

Karl Heinrich Ulrichs

The first gay person to speak out for homosexual rights in public. Karl Heinrich Ulrichs worked a civil servant in Germany until he was forced to resign in 1854 on because of his homosexuality.

He became an activist and wrote 12 volumes of work about sexuality. His publishes includes

“what’s believed to be the first theory about homosexuality”. He explained that it is an ‘inborn condition’ not a profound corruption, as was the general wisdom at the time.

In 1867, he urged the German government to abolish anti-homosexuality laws, which strongly proved himself as the pioneer of the gay rights movement.

Barbara Gittings

The mother of the LGBT civil rights movement. Barbara Gittings was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1932. She moved to Philadelphia, the USA at the age of 18.

In the 1970s, she was a leading member of the American Psychiatric Association’s movement to get homosexuality eliminated from the list of psychiatric disorders.

In 2006, The APA acknowledged her work by awarding her its first annual civil rights award.

Harvey Milk

The first openly gay person elected to public office,  Harvey Milk was born in New York in 1930 and became a leading gay rights activist.  After moving to San Francisco in 1972,

he found his voice in gay rights activist. He became the first gay person openly elected to public office. He won a seat on the San Francisco City Council Board after two previous unsuccessful attempts. Milk was shot dead in 1978 by Dan White, a fellow City Council board member.

Harvey Milk’s life has been marked in plenty of books and films, including the award-winning Milk (2008) starring Sean Penn.

Magnus Hirschfeld

The father of transgenderism, Hirschfeld is considered to have invented the term ‘transvestitism’. He set the world’s first gender identity clinic, whose clients included Einar Wegener (the protagonist of 2015’s The Danish Girl. She transitioned to become Lili Elbe, one of the first persons to undergo gender reassignment surgery. After moving to Berlin in 1896, Hirschfeld started researching sexuality where he lived openly as a gay man and fought for gay rights. He was once described by Hitler as “the most dangerous Jew in Germany”, and the whole library of his Institute for Sexual Science was destroyed by the Nazis.

Audre Lorde

The lesbian warrior poet, Audre Lorde represented herself as a ‘black lesbian mother warrior poet’.

Born in New York in 1934, Lorde served as a librarian for many years before she published her first volume of poetry, First Cities, in 1968. Her work covered everything from civil rights (The Black Unicorn) and sexuality to her own battle with breast cancer (A Burst of Light, for which Lorde received an American Book Award). She inspired Barbara Smith to found Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, the first U.S. publisher by, for, and about women of color. In 2001, the Audre Lorde Award was started to honor works of lesbian poetry.

Why Do The LGBT Comunity Use Rainbow As Their Symbol?

June is observed as the LGBT pride month in the United States. So you may be noticing rainbows everywhere.

The rainbow is the internationally accepted symbol of LGBT. But why rainbows, of all symbols? Why not other color combinations? Why a color combination at all, and not some type of shape as a logo instead?

This LGBT pride flag was designed in 1978 by Gilbert Baker. Baker was a gay rights activist, army veteran, artist, and self-styled “gay Betsy Ross.” He created the flag for the Gay Freedom Pride Parade held in San Francisco in 1978. He designed the flag at the request of Harvey Milk, a gay city politician who was assassinated later that year. The symbol took grasp immediately. It immediately became a symbol of LGBT pride.

The flag has changed over the years. The updated version has six colors, but the original had eight. Each color had its own symbolic meaning.

Pink — Sex

Red — Life

Orange — Healing

Yellow — Sunlight

Green — Nature

Turquoise — Magic

Blue — Peace

Violet — Spirit

By 1979, the flag has since dropped to six colors, for some reasons. Pink dye was prohibitively costly, and blue and turquoise were “merged” into royal blue. With six colors, the flag could still be fairly divided to line two sides of the road for a march in protest of Milk’s assassination in 1979.

Closeted gay people have also historically used shiny colors to indicate their homosexuality to each other, as Forrest Wickman wrote in Slate. The yellow and purple served the same purpose in Australia and the United States respectively. During the Holocaust, Nazis made gay men wear pink triangles as a symbol of sexual deviance.

The rainbow flag was a way of taking these different colors and converting them into an intelligible symbol, reclaimed by the LGBT community.

As Baker explained MOMA, “There was no other option than to accept the Rainbow Flag because till now we had the pink triangle from the Nazis. It was the symbol that they would use to signify gay people. It came from a horrible place of murder and holocaust and Hitler. We needed something attractive, something from us. The rainbow is so perfect because it actually fits our diversity in terms of race, gender, ages, all of those things.”

The rainbow also has some pop culture consequence for the LGBT community. Judy Garland, the star of “The Wizard of Oz,” has a huge following as a gay symbol, and is well-known for singing “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” in the movie.

Baker’s rainbow design has since moved on from just flags. It’s used to express solidarity with LGBT movements. When the United States Supreme Court opposed part of the Defense of Marriage Act in 2013, the Empire State Building sparked up in rainbow colors. And when in 2015’s Obergefell vs. Hodges case, the Supreme Court accepted the legality of gay marriage nationwide the White House also showed its rainbow stripes.

Conclusion – The flag has been modified in many places at many times. One variant used in Philadelphia this year added black and brown, to include all races. In 2001, one variant added a black stripe for AIDS awareness.

Top 5 Travel Destinations For Gay Couple

We’re witnessing more and more countries around the world approving right to same-sex couples. This change has brought opportunities for the gay couple to avail some incredible travel destinations. Here is a list of top destinations that have welcomed the LGBT community with open arms.

These destinations ensure relaxed attitudes and exciting bars, beaches, and nightclubs. If you endeavor sun, sand, and diversity, pack your sunscreen and sunglasses and head to any one of these 5 gay-friendly destinations.

Copenhagen, Denmark

Denmark is regarded as the home of Lego and is at the forefront of New Nordic Cuisine. But is also the first nation in the world to recognize registered same-sex partnerships. At the heart of Denmark is the relaxed charm of its compact cobblestoned capital, Copenhagen.

Copenhagen is home to Europe’s oldest bar that openly hosts gay people.  Another gay spot is Centralhjornet, which origin dates back to the 1950s. Apart from these two places, super-cool district of Vesterbro also happens to be the city’s red-light district. Copenhagen’s operative yet sharp fashion display, a dazzling array of cocktail bars, and excellent range of gay-friendly boutique hotels make it the gay-friendliest place in the world.

New Zealand

The whole world has admired the Land of the Long White Cloud for its comprehensive and liberal behavior toward the LGBT community. In 1998 New Zealand was the first nation to embrace the sign of “gay/lesbian-friendly” when referring to businesses and accommodation. This initiative is now accepted globally. The country offers an excellent network of gay- and lesbian-friendly hotels. These homestays cover the length and breadth of the country from the top of the semi-tropical North Island to the depths of the glacial South.

Since passing same-sex marriage laws in 2013, New Zealand has actively promoted same-sex marriage tourism to Australia and other Pacific nations where equality laws are less tolerant.

Toronto, Canada

Toronto continues to be a guide for the LGBT traveler in North America. Ad Canada is the most liberal and progressive nation in the Americas for the queer community.

The Village in Toronto, placed in Church-Wellesley, is the cultural queer hub of the city, exploding with galleries, theatres, and gay-friendly businesses. Home to events such as Pride Week Celebrations and Pride March and Dyke March, gay sub-culture has bloomed and flourished in The Village for decades. The place will soon be home to the world’s first gay-focused athletic center at 519 Church Street.

Palm Springs, US

Situated approximately 100 miles south-east of Los Angeles, Palm Springs is a sun-seekers’ paradise. Here the sun shines almost all year round and the city has embraced everything queer.

Palm Springs provides the LGBT traveler with a marvelous array of outdoor activities, world-class shopping and dining, and the world’s best poolside lounging.

Palm Springs also offers the largest range of male and female-only accommodation anywhere in the world.

Berlin, Germany

Every charm you could ever imagine up can be catered for in Berlin. Germany’s wild side is on display here and Berlin proudly boasts a lively and comprehensive gay history that dates back to the golden age of the 1920s. The districts of Schoenberg, Kreuzberg, and Prenzlauerberg offers a diverse range of clubs, bars, and restaurants for sampling.  There is no “closing time” in Berlin, so the party never ends!